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Take The A Train - Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington in London 1958 (Vinyl, LP)

9 thoughts on “ Take The A Train - Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington in London 1958 (Vinyl, LP)

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Take A Train With Duke Ellington on Discogs.4/5(1).
  2. Ellington, Duke - Take the 'a' Train - portlacanoficge.ceticerdirilenebullerslifetdist.co Music. Skip to main content. Try Prime EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,, in CDs & Vinyl (See Top in CDs & Vinyl) # in Classic Big Band # in Pop (CDs & Vinyl)/5(14).
  3. Duke Ellington was one of the architects of the big band era and, as pianist, composer and bandleader, was one of the most vital musical figures in 20th-century history. TAKE THE "A" TRAIN, as a song and musical composition, would become the Duke's signature piece/5(14).
  4. Quintessence Jazz Series: Take The "A" Train by Duke Ellington. Released in and distributed in Canada under the Camden label (subsidiary of Pickwick, subsidiary of RCA), catalog QJ MONO. Side 1: Take The "A" Train; Main Stem; I Got It Bad And That Ain't Good; Perdido; The Flaming Sword/5(14).
  5. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Take The A Train on Discogs. Label: Astan - • Format: Vinyl LP, Album, Mono • Country: Switzerland • Genre: Jazz • Style: Big Band. AR/LP/ Duke Ellington: His Most Important Second War Concert.
  6. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of The Duke In London on Discogs. Label: Decca - DX • Format: Vinyl 7 Duke Ellington And His Orchestra - The Duke In London (, Vinyl) | Discogs.
  7. Three factors stand out in the interpretation of Ellington's music on this album: Betty Roche's vocal on a multi-movement version of "Take The 'A' Train," the addition of Louis Bellson on drums (Skin Deep), and old Ellington material that has new life breathed into it.
  8. This song was written by Billy Strayhorn, who played piano and wrote arrangements for Duke Ellington's band. Strayhorn recalled that the song that became the signature opening piece for Duke Ellington and his Orchestra came to him with very little effort.

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